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for national defense and other reasons. but now they're loaning them out to local law enforcement and law enforcement's also buying drones directly. so they have high-resolution cameras, heat censors and sophisticated radar on the border protection drones that can help track criminal activity in the united states, just as the c.i.a. uses predators and other drones to spy on militants in pakistan, nuclear sites in iran and other targets around the globe. for decades, u.s. courts have allowed law enforcement to conduct aerial surveillance without a warrant. this is that sort of open spaces doctrine. i'm not saying it makes it right but the government has been doing it for decades. some of the courts have apparently ruled that what a person does in the open, even behind a back yard fence, can be seen from a passing airplane and is not protected by privacy laws. you know, i don't think i agree with that. if you're swimming in your pool in your back yard, if you're in your hot tub in your back yard, just because we have the technology to be able to see you in your hot tub, does that really mea
presidents, because if they do, they will have committed an act of murder. noncombatants under the law of war are protected, not subject to being killed randomly. so to suggest that the president won't answer that question somehow legitimizes that the drone program is going to result in being used against anybody in this room having a cup of coffee, to me, cheapens the debate and is something not worthy of -- mr. mccain: could i ask my colleague a question, especially on that subject? a lot of our friends, particularly senator paul and others, pride themselves on their strict adherence to the constitution and the decisions of the supreme court. isn't it true that as a result of an attack on long island during world war ii that an american citizen, among others, was captured and hung on american soil? and the united states supreme court upheld that execution because that individual was an enemy combatant? is that established without a doubt? the fact that these are enemy combatants, and no matter where they are, they are subject to the -- to the form of justice as the terrorist in world war ii
gun laws. it won't help. why? >> and newt gingrich a word a couldn't possibly repeat. and this is the authorized biography. and the king and his court. to hugo chavez joins me to talk about his surprising connections. you are looking live at the senate floor. we'll get to that in a few moments. and i sit down with the one and only don king. to have a personal connection to hugo chavez. we begin with breaking news on that deadly lion attack in california. the lion was shot and killed. he had been raised there for eight weeks. >> our thoughts and prayers go out to our friend and family at this trying time. >> i want to bring in a man who knows more than anybody else. first, a woman who worked with the santuary where the man lived. here is genny michaels. genny. you had personal knowledge of both the sanctuary and the lion who has sadly been put down. tell me about your experience. was there anything that made you feel there was a problem down the line? i didn't see any type of adepreaggres aggressive behavior. >> we are looking at a shot of you with him. when you were w
gun trade. >> what about stronger gun laws? >> they won't help. >> they won't help? >> no. >> why? >> because criminals don't care about gun laws. >> so the book of ayles of fox new chief calls the president lazy, the vice president, quote, as dumb as an ashtray, and newt gingrich a word i cent repeat. >> and the king in his court. from muhammad ali to mike tyson to hugo chavez, don king joins me to talk about his surprising connections. this is "piers morgan tonight." >> good evening. you're looking live at the senate floor where an extraordinary filibuster has been going now for nine hours. also much more, including our exclusive investigation of gun trafficking and my sit-down with don king, perhaps the least man you would expect to have a personal connection to hugo chavez. we begin with breaking news on that deadly lion attack in florida. a female intern was killed in a lion's cage at the project survival cat haven. the lion was shot and killed. he had been raised at the sanctuary from the age of 8 w k weeks. there's no word yet on what may have led to the attack. >> our tho
for the moment on gun violence prevention. as a law enforcement professional, not just as attorney general, but one who has been a judge and prosecutor, this whole idea of better enforcement of existing laws is one we both agree ought to be the goal, and it always is for any prosecutor. and yet enforcement of some of these laws is impeded by gaps in those laws, such as the absence of akron checks on firearms, which now in able about 40% of all firearm purchases to go without any check whatsoever. you would agree with that, wouldn't you? >> yet. there are loopholes. has become to describe them, that make the enforcement of existing laws extremely difficult and render those existing laws not nearly as effective as they might otherwise be. >> and those laws now prohibit purchases of firearms by categories of people, convicted felons, fugitives, drug addicts and abusers, and domestic violence abusers. purchases on firearms and ammunition, both firearms and ammunition. right now there's no background check as to purchases of ammunition, none whatsoever. and as a matter of common sense as well a
on the floor. for decades, u.s. courts have allowed law enforcement to conduct aerial surveillance without a warrant. this is that sort of open spaces doctrine. i'm not saying it makes it right but the government has been doing it for decades. some of the courts have apparently ruled that what a person does in the open, even behind a back yard fence, can be seen from a passing airplane and is not protected by privacy laws. you know, i don't think i agree with that. if you're swimming in your pool in your back yard, if you're in your hot tub in your back yard, just because we have the technology to be able to see you in your hot tub, does that really mean they have a right to look at what you are doing in your back yard, so i don't really accept that. i think it has been abused and something that really we should be fighting against the surveillance state. advocates say predators are simply more effective than other planes. flying out of earshot and out of sight, a predator bee can watch a target for 20 hours nonstop, far longer than any police helicopter or manned aircraft. i would say the
that it doesn't require measures like lawsuits in order to uphold the laws of this body has passed. certainly, it is confirmed in this position and i look forward to bringing the parties to the table to discuss the different points of view and see if we can find common ground. >> link you, and i know that state and local government would be appreciative of being involved in that process early on, being at that table, rather than presented with the settlement that they have to live with and have no role in bargaining for. >> thank you. senator, i share your view about the upfront preventive way and i was glad to see that we share those interests. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for dropping by the office since last week. >> it is my view that history will look back on this time and ask how it could happen that the united states of america and the congress did not respond vigorously what the scientific community has. we have scientists who tell us that if we do not get our act together and cut back substantially on greenhouse gas emissions, it is also likely that the temperature will ri
at the end of the last congress. how to make a law. just read the look. and i recognize that you would hardly recognize that civics lesson if you see what's happening on the floor here today and over the last period of time. but i have enormous, enormous respect for the chairman of the appropriations committee. we sat on that committee together for a number of years. i appreciate that he wanted to bring a bill to the floor that honors the budget control act. i disagree with the tactic of putting a reinforcement of the sequester into the law. it exists. we have to do the sequester unless we can head it off. unless the safety of our troops and their training, our national security, the education of our children, the safety of our neighbors, unless that takes precedence over protecting tax breaks for corporate jets, businesses that send jobs overseas, the list goes on and i mentioned it now more than one time. so i urge my colleagues to think carefully about this vote. this isn't a vote to shut down government or not. that vote will come another time. the senate isn't going to accept this bill.
of lawfulness of the illegal operation directed against a u.s. citizen, a senior operational leader of al qaeda. or an associated force. this is committee confidential but it is not classified. the fact of the matter is it is a 16 page, very hostile and -- very thoughtful and very impressive opinion, and yet, it cannot go into the public domain. i cannot ask you about some of the factors of this opinion even here and i think that's a mistake. i think the world we are now living in is so different and precise that the legal underpinnings for action really are important. secondly, it is one thing for a president to ask for a legal opinion prior to something that is ongoing. maybe even on going. it seems to me that after words, -- after words, -- afterwards, we should have the opportunity to assess the legality of that and if necessary, be able to clarify law, change a law, do whatever a constitutional legislative body does. i would just ask you to take a look at this. we have now -- i just got a note. it has been release now because it was leaked first. so -- [chuckles] >> that is one way of get
al qaeda leaders is lawful under certain circumstances. let me start with u.s. law. the president's legal authority derives from the authorization to use military force after september 18, 2001. congress should update this 12 year-old law. military and intelligence personnel defending against the terrorist threats to reface one decade after 9/11. including u.s. citizens. of course in addition to the statutory authority granted by congress, the president has broader authority to take necessary actions to defend the united states against terrorist threats. the targeted killing of american citizens, certain constitutional rights under the fourth and fifth amendments, even when they are up said the united states. the extent of those rights is not clear. what amount of process is due to an american outside the united states before being targeted by his government? i agree with the principal conclusions of the white paper that reportedly summarize the law as applicable to killing an american citizen who is a senior operation al qaeda leader. i agree that a senior al qaeda leader outside
that through. the president a year ago lined up -- signed a law that says that you can be detained indefinitely, that you can be sent from america to guantanamo bay without a trial, and he wants us to be comforted, he wants us to remember and think good of him because he says i don't intend to do so. it's not enough. i mean, would you tolerate a republican who stood up and said well, i like the first amendment, i'm quite fond of the first amendment, and i don't intend to break the first amendment but i might. would conservatives tolerate someone who said i like the second amendment? i think it's important and i am for gun ownership and i don't intend to violate the second amendment, but i might. would we tolerate that he doesn't intend to do so as a standard? we have to think about the standards being used overseas. the president finally admitted they interviewed him at google not too long ago, they interviewed him and asked him can you kill americans at home and he was evasive and he said but if there are rules, he said the rules would be different outside than inside. well, i certainly hope s
. calm down, senator, mr. holder is right. even if he doesn't explain the law very well, the u.s. government cannot randomly target american citizens on u.s. soil or anywhere else. i repeat that. the u.s. government cannot randomly target american citizens on u.s. soil or anywhere else. what it can do, under the laws of war, is target an enemy combatant, at anywhere, at any time, including on u.s. soil. this includes a u.s. citizen who is also an enemy combatant. the president can designate such a combatant if he belongs to an entity, government, say, or a terrorist network like al qaeda. that has taken up arms against the united states as part of an internationally recognized armed conflict. that does not include hanoi jane. such a conflict exists between the u.s. and al qaeda. so, mr. holder is right. the u.s. could have targeted, say, u.s. citizen anwar awlaki had he continued to live in virginia. the u.s. killed him in yemen before he could kill more americans. but under the law, awlaki was no different than the nazis who came ashore in long island in world war ii and were
of the children and education. we've made sure that our law enforcement is taken care of, but we've also made those difficult choices early on that washington could really learn from in budgeting. i congratulate congressman messer for bringing this particular bill. it's a good government bill. i know the other side of the aisle is talking about the sequester, and i find it ironic that "the washington times" today has a headline that says, 400 more jobs were created in spite of the sequester. so i don't believe that the sky is falling here. this legislation requires the president to do some simple math and include with his budget, should he choose to submit one, an estimate of the cost of the deficit per taxpayer. taxpayers just simply deserve to know how much they owe for washington's out-of-control spending. after all, every dime that the federal government borrows is saddled on this generation and the next generation and generations to follow. right now the cost of washington's $16 trillion of national debt totals more than $147,000 per taxpayer. in fact, approximately every minute, mr. spe
was involved in that? do you not get a chance to explain yourself in a court of law before you get a hellfire missile dropped on your head? so it just amazes me that people are so willing and eager to throw out the bill of rights and just say, oh, that's fine. you know, terrorists are a big threat to us. and, you know, i am a so fearful that they will attack me that i'm willing to give up my rights, i'm willing to give up on the bill of rights? i think we give up too easily. now, the president has responded and he said he hasn't killed anybody yet in america. and he says he doesn't intend to kill anyone in america, but he might. i frankly just don't think that's good enough. the president's oath of office says that i will -- not that "i might" or not that "i intend to" -- the president says "i will" protect, preserve, and defend the constitution. he doesn't say, i'll do it when it's practical or i'll do it unless it's unfeasible, unless it's unpleasant and people argue with me and i have to go through congress and i can't get anything done, then i will obey the constitution. it's a out there.
for "early start." >> "starting point" starts now. >>> welcome, everybody. today, osama bin laden's son-in-law caught and brought to new york under a shroud of secrecy. what happens next? >>> and details on how a lion killed a young woman. that wild animal wasn't where it belonged. former president clinton urging the supreme court to overturn a law he signed when he was in the white house. >> holy dow! we are counting down to a key report about jobs now less than two hours away. >> forget the right to bear arms. one small american town is about to make it mandatory. a gun for every house and every family. >>> plus, a first look at hollywood's risky bet on a brand new "wizard of oz." is the yellow brick road paved with box office gold? >> and talk about this morning the mom who found her 7-year-old daughter's diet list. we'll chat with dara-lynn weiss. we had a her here talking about her daughter's struggle with obesity. tommy davidson, actor and comedian, joins us. and abbie cornish joins us later. it's friday, march 8. "starting point" begins now. >>> welcome, everybody. our "starting point"
to the law, conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction or other terrorism related cases, but through the sting operations, identify them first. it's easy to be empathetic to the fbi's view, and i try to talk about it in the book which is that if you're a case agent, and you have a guy on tape saying, you know, i want to bomb the subway system, you don't want to be the guy who says let's ignore him, and then six months later, he commits an act of terrorism. it's easy to understand why the fbi pursues these cases, but what i put out in the book is that there has yet to be an example of someone on their own capable of terrorism, someone who is a loud mouth, do you want have weapon, and meeting an operative and says, hey, here's a bomb. the only people providing the capacity is actually the fbi. you know, these sting operations are an evolution of drug stings. you've seen where, you know, in the movies, a guy has an empty briefcase, and two people believe there's cocaine inside, hand over the money, and hand over the briefcase, they open it, it's empty, they rush in and arrest the person
's it for us. thanks for watching. "early start" begins now. >>> caught. osama bin laden's son-in-law, an al qaeda mouthpiece, now in u.s. custody. you will not believe where he was hiding. >> the dow's history-making winning streak continues as the focus flips to jobs now in the key report. is your situation getting any better. >>> sloshing your way to work. a windy, snowy, disgusting mess hanging over the northeast right now. this is the winter storm that will not go away. >> sell it, berman. >>> it's not a right to bear arms. it is a requirement. the town that wants everyone to own a gun. good morning. welcome to "early start." thanks for being with us. i'm zoraida sambolin. >> and i'm john berman. it is friday, march 8th. 5:00 a.m. in the east. we'll start with a major very many in had the war on terror. sending shockwaves from manhattan to capitol hill to the middle east. osama bin laden's son-in-law captured and in u.s. custody and in just hours, abu ghaith will be in new york. more on how we caught him and the controversy surrounding this court appearance. susan candiotti is here. >>
them under the law of war, we're going to exploit intelligence but we're going to do it within the laws that we've signed up to like the geneva convention, the convention against torture. so to my friends on this side of the aisle -- mr. durbin: would the senator yield for a question? mr. graham: absolutely. mr. durbin: to my colleagues on the other side of the aisle it was 12 hours ago i was standing here, a lonely voice among others who were discussing this issue bringing up the points that you raise. the first is the drone is a weapon. there are many weapons that can deliver lethal force. we should view this as an issue of lethal force, not an issue of drones per se, although it may raise some particular questions and application. it is largely a question of lethal force. the second question has been raised by the senator from -- both senators. what if the fourth airplane had not been brought down by the passengers? what if that plane were headed for this capitol building and all other planes had been landed across america under orders of our government and we knew this plane was the
the absolute right to choice. and it is the law of the land. so that is where we are with that subject. now, on the gay rights, here is how i feel about that. ten years ago, this was a huge issue, absolutely huge issue. ten years from now it will not be a huge issue. it's the fastest movement of a wave of understanding, of pure rights and equal protection under the law. >> even in south carolina you think there has been an attitude change? >> there has definitely been an attitude change in south carolina. and we see it moving rapidly, as a matter of fact. now south carolina is a state that does not -- does not allow same-sex marriage. but we'll see where that takes us in ten years. there is a definite movement, a definite change of attitude in south carolina, yes. >> okay. let's say you win the primary, and then it's, of course, i would pick maybe mark sanford on the other side. i don't know what the polling is there, but it would certainly be great to see you defeat him. could you defeat him? >> well, ed, let me be really clear about something first. we have got to get through the first pr
/11 is right now sitting in new york city. not gitmo. we'll debate the fate of osama bin laden's son-in-law. >>> plus, a medical examiner needs help identifying bodies. so he's posting their graphic pictures online. >>> and -- >> what did you say? what did you say? >> bieber drama. showing up late, collapsing, tweeting suggestive pics. are we watching another star fall? >>> happy friday. good to see all of you. i'm brooke baldwin. at the vatican today, it was the vote to decide the vote. so now we have a date. it is march 12th that is next tuesday. that is when those 115 cardinals will meet to choose benedict's successor. that's when we start the so-called smoke watch. remember this from eight years ago? here it was, when we saw the white smoke rising above the vatican, from the chimney, there at the beautiful sistine chapel in rome. that is when the world knows. that's a signal when we will have a new pope. the white smoke. but until then, there is a lot to do. in fact, the chimney hasn't even been built yet. and as far as communications there has been a ban inside this hotel where the car
commissioner was severely injured and now he is in a stable condition. sectionementation of 144 of the law had been implemented. that means more than four people are now banned and the military in that one district alone are trying to classify the situation in there. but the situation there is very typical to cross the country. 10 kilometers outside of the capital, four dead here, one dead here. it we're slowly getting in more reports of individuals, women or children, coming through u.s. year. thisthere has been an over ove and turning it over on friday. the strike has been well observed. we have been driving around to see what is different with the schools mostly closed. >> that was our correspondent on the line there from dakkar on the situation in bangladesh, still very hostile. the military mobilized in malaysia after they found and killed five policemen. two gunmen also killed on sunday night and they're suspected of being linked to a group of armed intruders and that group has been holed up in the state for more 3 weeks now. they refused to surrender. 14 people were killed in a shootout
the laws can remain, but cannot obtain the cherished fruits of citizenship. here is jeb bush, on the first stop on his book tour yesterday, on the "today" show. >> when it comes to a path to citizenship, all right, you fall short of that. you want legal residency, but -- and you want people to admit they've committed a crime by coming here illegally to pay back taxes and pay some fines, but not offer them a path to citizenship. if they do all the things you've asked of them, why not grant that right to become an american? >> because this proposal is a proposal that looks forward. and if we want to create an immigration policy that's going to work, we can't continue to make illegal immigration an easier path than legal immigration. >> that was a pretty big flip-flop from what jeb bush had to say just nine months ago. >> either a path to citizenship, which i would support, and that does put me, probably out of the mainstream of most conservatives, or a path to legalization. a path to residency, of some kind. >> jeb bush quickly got tangled up by the media in yesterday's flip-flop, and began
't those types? >> yes, but making it a law bounding, requiring the treasury department to actually take action i think would make a difference. >> okay. that's my only question. thanks, mr. chairman. >> thank you. we go now to ms. gabbard. >> thank you to our panel here for being here today. i represent the second congressional district in hawaii, which as we have seen for the last couple of lunches, experts have testified that hawaii a low whistle of our northwestern states are within range within missile range of north korea. so this is an issue that's very real for us, not only as a state but also because of our military presence there and strategic location within our national defense. i'm wondering your view of what the current estimate is realistically of when north korea may have a warhead missile combination that could strike the united states, as well as your assessment of our missile defense and we can do to prevent this from occurring, or at least slowing down their progress? >> well, i believe they are quite a ways from having that capability, congresswoman. i was talking ab
do under the laws of war is target an enemy combatant at anytime anywhere. the president can designate such a combatant if he belongs to an enemy that has taken up arms against the u.s. this does not include hanoid jane. arguing we need more than political stunts that fire up kids in their college dorms. [ applause ] >> stephanie: fight! fight! fight! this just in by the way -- [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: this actually puts the republicans once again on the side of -- >> right. >> stephanie: regardless of what our concerns are, despite controversy, a new poll shows majority of americans on both sides of the aisle support the program. last year 55% of americans approved. 56% now approve, just 26% disapprove. >> i approve of foreign program but not a domestic program. >> stephanie: this is what the attorney general just explained. what if it is an emmy combatant. he -- this is -- eric holder letter. >> quote, does the president have the authority to use a whe onized drone to kill an american not engaged in combat on american soil? the
though is the national organization for the marijuana laws failed miserably in its attempts to the cloister regional marijuana. but then seized upon medical marijuana had enormous success. just like they say, you spoke a little bit of marijuana and mixture onto. in this case can be smoke legal medical marijuana and yearned to full legalization concert of a steppingstone. the ones that have legalized it r.d. have medical marijuana. just a development thing if people give our customers, not so shocking to know that. the next state to legalize possibly be new york. that is my opinion. the northern north liberal states in the western states in particular are going to be the states most likely at this point in time. i'm not sure this is the legalize marijuana if they have to be south of the mason dixon line. those are basically republican dominated conservative state and i think it would be unlikely for them to legalize anytime in the near future with the possible exception of texas. there's a liberal element, mostly based in austin and doubtless that is growing fast and it may n
in the union has what are called good samaritan laws. they allow people to help in a medical emergency without fear of legal jeopardy. >> today lorraine bayliss' daughter, a nurse herself, released this statement. i don't believe if cpr were done it would have helped or changed this the result. this is not about my mother or me. this is about the policy. i agree with what was done. but bakersfield police now say they're reviewing the call, a probe into possible criminal wrongdoing. this, as many are asking, could more have been done. >> i understand if your boss is telling you can't do it. >> yeah. >> but as a human being, is there anyone willing to help this lady and not let her die? >> um, not at this time. >> reporter: tonight, one state lawmaker is asking for a review of that 911 call. rudy solas says he is shocked by what he heard. meantime, the owners and operators of this facility who say they own the most senior facilities of anywhere in the country say they too are conducting a thorough investigation. brian? >> miguel almaguer starting us off in bakersfield, california tonight. miguel
to suspend the $16.4 trillion debt limit. they would pass a law to dock lawmakers' pay unless the democratally-controlled senate passes a budget, which it hasn't done in nearly four years. >> i think that was a gimmick. just giving barack obama a blank check for four months is inane as far as i'm concerned. >> reporter: he told me that he is very concerned about cuts in the military and says we need to increase the spending in the military and there is a better way to apply the cuts. >> eric: on the other side, john, president obama blames the republicans that, john boehner won't sit dun to talk about the fiscal situation. americans are sick of this going from crisis to crisis. what can come down the road, do you think? >> reporter: paul brown says there is a better way to do this. and in fact, that may be in the works. despite what you heard gene sperling just say about when republicans feel the depth and the pain from these cuts, maybe they will get religion. they are already at work on an alternative to this sequester as laid out, the budget chief paul ryan says he has agre
meeting on wednesday. teachers must be notified about possible layoffs by march 15th. >>> a new state law banning public school fees is causing a lot of confusion. the law prohibits schools for charging fees for classroom items and activities. schools are prohibited for requiring students to bring certain materials to class. schools and teachers are trying to raise money for field trips and school supplies. they say they're not sure exactly what the law allows. supporters of the law say it was necessary because charging fees was putting a financial burden on low income families. >>> the finishing touches are being made this evening at a project turning the bay bridge in to a 1.8-mile long massive light show. it could mean big business to the cities. >> reporter: in the daylight you may not notice the changes to the bay bridge. but look closer. those tiny dots on the cables are l.e.d. lights. on tuesday night, the lights go on for a two-year light show. ben davis conceived of the idea. now after two and a half years and $6 million in private funds raised, the artist has made it a reality.
an analogy to the use of torture. there are american laws and international laws against the use of torture. now, george bush said that he could override that, right, as president. and he could use torture because he believes we got good information. he violated international law and was never held responsible for it. president obama disagrees with president bush on torture but president obama does believe his executive authority gives him an unlimited ability to use drones as killing machines overseas and now we know in the united states of america. and i think that pushes the authorization too far as well. >> absolutely. >> bill: those are all of the questions that have not been answered. look, there are always going to be wars. there are always going to be drones, now we know. and i'm not saying ban drones, shoot, put them all down and never use them again. but there has to be some guiding policy on when the use of a drone is acceptable and when its's not for what purpose against whom and that policy i believe also should be made by congress, not the president of the united states. we do
and unafraid. if there >> shepard: this is the fox report. tonight, usama bin laden's son-in-law reported captured. apparently now in new york city to face a trial. now questions about how this happened, when and where. plus, the white house responds to that question from senator rand paul. is it legal for the government to drone us and kill us right here? >> you can kill an american on american soil, a noncombatant with a drone strike? >> the question he raised was entirely appropriate and should have already been answered. >> i don't this administrations any intention of using drones in the united states. >> the president swore an oath to uphold the constitution and he is bound by the law. >> shepard: tonight, looking to clear up the confusion about targeting americans on u.s. soil. north korea, threatening a preemptive nuclear strike against the united states. >> the pentagon takes the capabilities that the north koreas have seriously. >> even one of north korea's long time allies now saying that country has gone too far. so what now? for dennis rodman's best buddies? thousands of shar
mccain says enough is enough. he joins us to talk about that and osama bin laden's son-in-law on american soil. >> i believe he's an enemy combatant and he should be in guantanamo. >> growing pains, passing out, smoking pot, fighting with photographers. what's really going on with justin bieber? >> what did you say? >>menounos knows him well. she joins me. >> and also clive davis and his love for women and men. >> found that the attitude in general towards bisexuality is you're either gay, you're straight, our you're lying. >> this is "piers morgan tonight." good evening. the stage is set for dramatic trial in new york city. osama bin laden's son-in-law and mouth piece is in a manhattan jail after pleading not guilty to terrorism charges. it's the first toom new yorkers got to see him face-to-face, and it comes on a very busy day on america's security front. also stinging criticism of the t tsa allowing small knives and bats on planes. they say passengers should be allowed to go on board with battle-axes and even machetes. a lot of people are stunned by it, including my first
. the only ones that would have guns would be the government and of course criminals who ignore gun laws. i call it the mexico model. guns are outlawed in mexico. the citizens cannot possess guns. there is no second amendment. so the government has guns and criminals have guns. some of those criminals have guns thanks in part to the united states government sending 2,000 assault weapons to them in fast and furious. but that's another story. u.s. cities are moving toward the mexico model. chicago and washington, d.c., have laws that make it very difficult for a citizen to exercise the second amendment. these cities make it difficult to even own a firearm, but all three places -- mexico, chicago, washington, d.c. -- all have a reputation of violent, unsafe places. why? because they are. in d.c., if d.c. was so safe, why are government guards everywhere in the city? even here in this capitol building there are armed guards on the roof, at the doors, at the back doors, at the doors over to the east and to the west. it's hypocritical of the gun control crowd in this chamber to say more guns for
which the president signed into law two years ago this month have already extended the life of the medicare trust fund to at least 2024. going forward the budgettary challenges posed by the medicare program will be largely contingent on the pace of health care costs. now, a balanced approach to addressing our fiscal challenges must also recognize the importance of timing. the recovery is still fragile. weak growth in europe and asia are eliminating our exports. consumption remains constrained as households are still recovering from the loss of $16 trillion of wealth from the financial crieses. -- crisis. we haven't regained all of the $16 trillion that was lost although we've made substantial progress. fiscal policy should remain the focus in supporting the ongoing recovery. at the same time, we should stake steps to address the deficit in a balanced way in the intermediate and long-term. the sequester is poorly timed and badly targeted. before the sequester, i used to say that we faced two risks when it comes to the government budget. on the one hand, we can lower the defic
to continue at the same levels, yes sequestration is still the law of the land but we're not going to rely on these broad -- they call them meat ax cuts. troop levels get this much funding, border security gets this much funding, democrats want to say we're going to put money into head start. we're going to put some money into education programs or transportation. grabbing their authority back from what they see as the broad cuts of sequestration. >> suarez: people may be sitting at home listening to what you just said and think "i've seen this movie before." there's just over three weeks until the sand runs through the hour glass and the republicans in the house and the democrats and the senate look like they're going to come up with different versions of that continuing resolution. then what? >> it's a game of ping-pong is what we call it on capitol hill. the old idea of the house passes a version, the senate passes a version, they gate conversation committee together and work it out. that's dead for now. there's no capacity for a conference. what's going to happen is the house is going
's son-in-law and mouth piece is in a manhattan jail after pleading not guilty to terrorism charges. it's the first time new yorkers got to see him face-to-face, and it comes on a very busy day on america's security front. also stinging criticism of the tsa allowing small knives and bats on planes. they say passengers should be allowed to go on board with battle-axes and even machetes. a lot of people are stunned by it, including my first guest, senator john mccain who is making news right here about it. senator, welcome to you. >> thank you, piers, good to be back. >> you're all over the news again today, predominantly involving osama bin laden's son-in-law, sulaiman abu ghaith, you're not happy at all that he's been tried in a criminal court. why is that? >> i believe he's an enemy combatant and according to the rules of war, he should be tried as such and he should be in guantanamo. and one of the questions that should be asked, if that is not the case, and clearly it's not, how soon was he given his miranda rights, and if he has been, his good lawyers will tell him not to talk. we n
. there are a variety of reasons for that. one is poor law enforcement capacity. even if the government wants to, and we know that because of long years of dictatorship, when our military dictatorships and authoritarian regimes they enforce a certain element of consensus which appears to be a consensus. beneath that, expressions are being stilted. these military groups raise their ugly head. -- militant groups raise their ugly head. the pakistani shias being butchered in karachi. the hazara community was being targeted for the last 70 years. i think there is a lot of things which the government of pakistan has to be responsible to. why do you keep investing in submarines when your local law enforcement lacks the capacity of forensic sciences? >> egypt's former president will barack will a retrial on april 13. over the killing of hundreds of protesters during the uprising that deposed him two years ago. however, in january cairo's appeal court granted him a retrial. at least 253 people have been hurt in new protests in port said. the unrest was triggered by the decision to move 39 prisoners charged in a
. cbo recently predicted that tax revenue under current law will double in the next 10 years. from two point $4 trillion to $5 trillion in 10 short years. -- $2.4 trillion to $5 trillion in 10 short years. it is time for washington to -- >> good morning. i have freshman member from the state of montana. i have a different resume than most in congress. i'm not a lawyer. spent 28 years in the private sector. i have an engineering degree. i have been creating jobs and i understand how to balance a budget. i understand businesses and the family budget. you have to find ways to do more with less. i left the private sector because i saw a financial crisis that was coming. i wife and i have four children. i have two college graduates ready to go into the workforce. i represent 1,000,001 canada -- residence. montana they will have a balanced budget. i think we can take some of those ideas back to washington. we take ideas from hard-working moms back in montana. they know if they cannot spend more than they take in. we have a responsibility. we are responsible to the american people, our kids,
and they take an oath of secrecy. >>> osama bin laden's son-in-law is waking up in new york state he'll appear in a federal courtroom today. sulaiman abu ghaith also an al qaeda spokesman. john miller joins us now. >> it's always good to wake up in new york city if you're not osama bin laden's son-in-law. >> then you'd like to wake up in afghanistan. >> somewhere. >> somewhere, in a cave. is this a big deal? >> it is a big deal on two levels, one from a symbolic sense this was the guy after 9/11 was on television speaking to americans saying that there is a great army massing against you and be prepared for a storm of airplanes. so as one of bin laden's key basically, charlie, public affairs advisers and spokesmen, he was a key propagandaist and voice and had a lot of religious credibility. the other thing is from an intelligence standpoint he knows things how the al qaeda command structure that was in iran for a long time worked and communicated. >> where has he been for the last dozen years? >> with a bunch of al qaeda leaders in iran. that's an interesting question nora
't kill americans in cafes. >> calm down, senator. mr. holder is right. even if he doesn't explain the law very well. >> the young guns versus the old guard in the u.s. senate. is this a vision of what's to come in 2014. and later -- >> very sad for the people that will not be able to see the inside of the gorgeous white house. >> a lot of people, it's a once in a lifetime opportunity to go in the white house. >> today's the first day that they can't go to the white house. they say tours are a sequester casualty. we continue to watch developing news from south africa. that's where nelson mandela was admitted to a hospital in pretoria this afternoon. doctors say this is all for a scheduled medical check-up to manage some pre-existing conditions. they add at this point there's no reason for alarm. you'll remember the 94-year-old former south african president spent 18 days in the hospital back in december, but again, we are monitoring nelson mandela's hospital visit in south africa. we'll continue to keep you up-to-date on that. first, though, secretary of defense chuck hagel is in afghanist
executive pay. the law would allow shareholders to vote on compensation for executives. they would have to pass bonuses and large payouts. executives could be fined and would face jail if they broke the rules. many say they support any effort to stop rewarding executives for poor performance. >> i voted yes to the initiative. i think it is important to have a frame to control what happens and to wake up our politicians, realize that the company must be the shareholders and the decision should be theirs. >> i think we could have gone farther here dime in favor of the socialist proposal, offering a different option for the lowest and highest salary. this proposal is the minimum we can do. >> i think it's a form of blackmail to say if top managers are not better paid, they will go elsewhere. i think we need international agreement to stop that. >> malaysia and are confronting philippine fighters -- malaysian soldiers are confronting philippine fighters. are investigating whether an attack was linked to filipino fighters. traveled0 filipinos to the region to claim land they say is ancestral
for stew. -- forced dues. that is where the thing in legal contract law that says each side has to get something and give something up to have a valid contract. in this case the woers are getting or the union is getting 10 years of forced dues and the only thing the workers are getting is a privilege to pay those dues until 2023. neil: we should explain the right to work, you as a right of the employee of the state whether you want to be in a union or not. if you're the union he said such a good deal because we will get better pay packages and the like, to be an honor to stay with them, you won't bat an eyelash at it. the people are concerned they will look at this coming to the quick conclusion isn't worth the money or the aggravation, and that is why they're doing this, right? >> the union is worry once workers are given a choice, that is all writes to work is, gives a choice whether to pay the union and still keep their job the unions worry once you have that choice they will say forget it, you are not doing a good job and i don't want to pay you. a lot of them say they look at the
in the long run it's the rule of law and the political resolution of challenges that provide for all minorities in iraq the best opportunity, the military itself, when i see them in action, trying to work it out with the kurdish situation to the north, appear to be willing to negotiate, to talk, not to go to arms, i see them doing the same thing with the sunni troubles out west, that's the role of the military to but tres law and the rule of law, not to try to provide security as the sole solution to that problem. >> i do hope that you and your successor will look for ways that we can press the iraqis to do what they committed to do, which is protect minorities inside of iraq. >> yes, sir. >> thank you. senator inhofe. >> thank you, mr. chairman. in my opening statement i talked about what we did, senator too mi and i headed -- toomey and i headed up the effort to allow more flexibility with the chiefs, and i talked to the chiefs about this and they responded strongly that yes in the same top line operating for the same amount of money would we be able to get, to reduce the devastati
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